Quantcast
Mongabay.com is considered a leading source of information on tropical forests by some of the world's top ecologists and conservationists. TROPICAL RAINFORESTS: TROPICAL RAINFORESTS

TANZANIA

Tanzania Forest Figures

Forest Cover
Total forest area: 35,257,000 ha
% of land area: 39.9%

Primary forest cover: n/a
% of land area: n/a
% total forest area: n/a

Deforestation Rates, 2000-2005
Annual change in forest cover: -412,200 ha
Annual deforestation rate: -1.1%
Change in defor. rate since '90s: 11.0%
Total forest loss since 1990: -6,184,000 ha
Total forest loss since 1990:-14.9%

Primary or "Old-growth" forests
Annual loss of primary forests: n/a
Annual deforestation rate: n/a
Change in deforestation rate since '90s: n/a
Primary forest loss since 1990: n/a
Primary forest loss since 1990:n/a

Forest Classification
Public: 99.8%
Private: 0.2%
Other: n/a
Use
Production: 71%
Protection: n/a
Conservation: 6%
Social services: n/a
Multiple purpose: 22.9%
None or unknown: n/a

Forest Area Breakdown
Total area: 35,257,000 ha
Primary: n/a
Modified natural: 35,107,000 ha
Semi-natural: n/a
Production plantation: 150,000 ha
Production plantation: n/a

Plantations
Plantations, 2005: 150,000 ha
% of total forest cover: 0.4%
Annual change rate (00-05): n/a

Carbon storage
Above-ground biomass: 3,636 M t
Below-ground biomass: 873 M t

Area annually affected by
Fire: 9,000 ha
Insects: n/a
Diseases: n/a

Number of tree species in IUCN red list
Number of native tree species: n/a
Critically endangered: 8
Endangered: 35
Vulnerable: 49

Wood removal 2005
Industrial roundwood: 2,833,000 m3 o.b.
Wood fuel: 25,200,000 m3 o.b.

Value of forest products, 2005
Industrial roundwood: n/a
Wood fuel: n/a
Non-wood forest products (NWFPs): n/a
Total Value: n/a


More forest statistics for Tanzania

Tanzania still has extensive forest cover, most of which is savanna woodland and montane forest, though there are scattered patches of lowland forest. Much of this forest has high biodiversity and endemism—especially in the southern highlands region. However, these forests are increasingly threatened by fuelwood collection by the rapidly expanding population, as well as by commercial felling of timber and expanding agriculture—which makes up 58 percent of the GNP.

In 2002, the Tanzanian government passed the Forest Act which banned exportation of logs starting in July 2004. However, the regulations were poorly enforced and illegal logging continued apace—by one estimate the country lost 91,000 hectares to illegal felling each year. In early 2006, the Tanzanian government reinforced the export ban logs and sandalwood in an effort to reduce deforestation. The country planted 100 million trees between 1999 and 2006.

Despite 40 percent of the country being preserved in parks, forests are being reduced rapidly in some regions. Overall forest cover fell by 15 percent between 1990 and 2005, but deforestation rates have increased significantly since 2000.

Tanzania's mountainous forests have been in the news lately with the discovery of a new species of monkey and the imminent extinction of a small yellow toad. Overall, Tanzania is home to more than 10,000 species of plants, 316 mammals, 1,056 species of birds, 335 reptiles, 116 amphibians, and 331 species of fish.

Recent articles | Tanzania news updates | XML

Using DNA evidence to pinpoint poaching zones
(06/30/2015) A study published last week in Science showed that most of the ivory being trafficked today comes from two areas in Africa: savanna elephant ivory from southeast Tanzania in East Africa and forest elephant ivory from the meeting point of Gabon, the Republic of Congo, Cameroon, and Central African Republic.


The poachers' bill: at least 65,000 elephants in Tanzania
(06/02/2015) During the last couple years there have been persistent rumors and trickles of information that elephant poaching was running rampant in Tanzania as the government stood by and did little. Yesterday, the government finally confirmed the rumors: Tanzania's savanna elephant population has dropped from 109,051 animals in 2009 to just 43,330 last year—a plunge of 60% in just five years.


Photo essay: Polluted, overfished, and choked by weeds, world's second-largest lake is 'on its knees'
(06/02/2015) Lake Victoria is choking with pollution from industrial, agricultural, and human waste. Its problems are compounded by illegal fishing, catching of juvenile fish, and infestations of water hyacinth and the carnivorous Nile perch, which has wiped out many native fish species. Activists say lax law enforcement and a lack of political will are failing the lake, whose fisheries help feed nearly 22 million people.


Drone Herders: Tanzanian rangers and researchers use UAVs to protect elephants and crops
(05/27/2015) HEC, otherwise known as human elephant conflict, is a centuries-old problem responsible for the deaths of untold numbers of elephants. This ongoing battle between African farmers trying to grow crops and hungry elephants foraging for a meal, has motivated conservationists to find solutions for protecting the largest and one of the most intelligent land animals on the planet. Scientists’ most recent effort -- Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), frisbee-sized remote controlled quad-helicopters -- may provide the answer that researchers have been looking for.


Scientists identify frog through DNA without leaving forest
(05/05/2015) Yesterday, a team of Italian scientists caught a frog in a montane forest in Tanzania. And then they made history: using a small blood sample the team were able to extract, purify, and amplify the amphibian's DNA—all in the forest—through a new, battery-powered device called the Expedition Genomics Lab.


Keeping up with the climate: efforts to reduce African crop losses face the extra hurdle of climate change
(04/21/2015) The loss of crops to insects, rodents, and mold before they ever reach consumers is a newly recognized problem that governments and development organizations are just starting to address. But as climate change begins to unfold, this job is only getting harder.


Empowering women in order to save the harvest
(04/16/2015) There are plenty of technological challenges to reducing food waste in sub-Saharan Africa, but a challenge that might prove more important to overcome is gender inequality. Women are responsible for nearly half of agricultural labor in sub-Saharan Africa, with some estimates reaching up to 90 percent. But they often don't have the authority to make financial decisions for their families, even when it comes to managing or selling the crops they've grown themselves.


The crop-saving champion of Tanzania: Bertha Mjawa
(04/15/2015) In the late 1980s, Bertha Mjawa remembers seeing endless quantities of fruits and vegetables getting thrown out across Tanzania because rot or insects had gotten to them. Years later, she has helped turn Tanzania into a model for reducing food waste.


Unique center trains Tanzanian farmers to preserve their fruits and veggies
(04/14/2015) Farmers and traders throughout sub-Saharan Africa lose nearly half of their fruits and vegetables before they reach the consumer. To get more food to people who need it, the Postharvest Training and Services Center teaches them better methods of storing, processing, and transporting their crops.


New solutions aim to deliver more grain from farm to table in sub-Saharan Africa
(04/13/2015) Corn is an integral part of many meals in Tanzania and its neighboring East African countries, but much of the harvest is lost to insects, rats, or mold. Researchers are developing ways to help farmers keep their harvest fresh longer in storage.


Conservationists announce program to protect East Africa's largest elephant population
(03/12/2015) The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the Tanzanian government have launched an ambitious new initiative to protect East Africa's largest population of elephants (Loxodonta Africana). With funds from USAID, the plan aims to reduce poaching and protect biodiversity - including the area's 25,000 elephants- across an 115,000 square kilometer ecosystem.


Financial pledges for REDD+ slow to be disbursed, finds report
(01/27/2015) Only a small fraction of the $7.3 billion pledged under the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+) program has actually been disbursed, find a new report that tracked REDD+ finance in seven countries. The report, published by Forest Trends, analyzed REDD+ financial flows between 2009 and 2012 in Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Ghana, Liberia, Tanzania and Vietnam


Tribal violence comes naturally to chimpanzees
(12/08/2014) It all went to hell when Jane Goodall started handing out bananas. Within a few years, the previously peaceful chimpanzees she was studying split into two warring tribes. Gangs of males from the larger faction systematically slaughtered their former tribemates. All over the bananas. Or so the argument goes.


One-two punch: farming, global warming destroying unique East African forests
(12/03/2014) Lush mountains speckle East Africa's grasslands and desert, from Mozambique to Ethiopia. These isolated habitats are home to a plethora of species, and are considered by scientists to be some of the most biodiverse regions in the world. However, their forests are being cut down for farmland and are threatened by global warming, putting at risk multitudes of species that have nowhere else to go.


Chameleon crisis: extinction threatens 36% of world's chameleons
(11/24/2014) Chameleons are an unmistakable family of wonderfully bizarre reptiles. They sport long, shooting tongues; oddly-shaped horns or crests; and a prehensile tail like a monkey's. But, chameleons are most known for their astonishing ability to change the color of their skin. Now, a update of the IUCN Red List finds that this unique group is facing a crisis that could send dozens of chameleons, if not more, to extinction.


Corruption in Tanzania facilitates ivory trade
(11/06/2014) Corruption in Tanzania is enabling large volumes of illegal elephant ivory to be smuggled out of the country, alleges a new report from the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA).


Photos: slumbering lions win top photo prize
(10/27/2014) The king of beasts took this year's top prize in the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition, which is co-owned by the Natural History Museum (London) and the BBC. The photo, of female lions and their cubs resting on a rock face in the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania, was taken by Michael 'Nick' Nichols, a photographer with National Geographic.


Google's new Gombe Street View lets users 'walk' along chimp trails and into Jane Goodall's house
(10/24/2014) Google Maps is now available for Tanzanian forest paths. Users can walk virtually along the same trails Jane Goodall has used for her decades of chimpanzee monitoring -- and even into her house.


Norway puts $1.6B into rainforest conservation
(08/19/2014) Since 2008 Norway has been the single largest foreign donor to tropical forest conservation, putting more than 10 billion Norwegian Krone, or $1.6 billion, toward programs in several countries under its International Climate and Forest Initiative. But how effective have those funds been in actually protecting forests?


U.S should sanction Mozambique for its role in elephant, rhino poaching, urges NGOs
(07/03/2014) Two prominent NGOs U.S should sanction Mozambique for its role in elephant, rhino poaching, urges NGOsare petitioning the U.S government to slap Mozambique with trade sanctions due to the country's role in regional poaching. The groups contend that Mozambique has done little to combat both its own poaching epidemic or stop its nationals from spilling over the border to kill rhinos and elephants in South Africa and Tanzania.


A taste for wildlife: what's driving bushmeat hunting in Tanzania?
(06/25/2014) Barbed-wire snares, spent shotgun shells, the lingering smell of gunpowder, and strips of curing meat: glimpses from a bushmeat hunt. Bushmeat hunting is the illegal hunting of wildlife for food and income. A new study reports regular bushmeat consumption by a large proportion of Tanzania’s tribal populations. Co-authors Silvia Ceppi and Martin Nielson were hunting for their own answers: who was eating bushmeat and why?


Regional court kills controversial Serengeti Highway
(06/23/2014) The Serengeti ecosystem got a major reprieve last week when the East African Court of Justice (EACJ) ruled against a hugely-controversial plan to build a paved road through Tanzania's Serengeti National Park. The court dubbed the proposed road 'unlawful' due to expected environmental impacts.


Next big idea in forest conservation? Making community protection economically viable
(05/29/2014) After years of discovering new species and setting up protected areas, Neil Burgesses' career changed. Currently he is focused on community-driven conservation and on how to improve protected areas in Africa's Eastern Arc mountains region. Neil Burgess has worked in the conservation field for over twenty years, mainly in Tanzania where he also lived for five years.


Birds of the Serengeti – book review
(02/27/2014) Birds of the Serengeti: And Ngorongoro Conservation Area by Adam Scott Kennedy may be the best birding book available covering the general safari region for northwestern Tanzania and southern Kenya. Filled with firsthand accounts, excellent photographs, and broken down into chapters by habitats, Birds of the Serengeti: And Ngorongoro Conservation Area is the guidebook for the broader non-scientific community.


Animals of the Serengeti – book review
(02/19/2014) Animals of the Serengeti: And Ngorongoro Conservation Area by Adam Scott Kennedy and Vicki Kennedy is an easy-to-use guidebook that is also very readable. The region covered by the book is the Greater Serengeti area bounded in the west by Lake Victoria and the east by Lake Manyara in Tanzania, and in the north by southern Kenya.


Suggested reading - Books


Unless otherwise specified, this article was written by Rhett A. Butler [Bibliographic citation for this page]

Other resources

Contact me if you have suggestions on other rainforest-related environmental sites and resources for this country.


Image copyright Google Earth, MDA EarthSet, DigitalGlobe 2005

CIA-World Factbook Profile
FAO-Forestry Profile
World Resources Institute


Last updated: 8 Feb 2006






what's new | rainforests home | for kids | help | madagascar | search | about | languages | contact

Copyright Rhett Butler 1994-2015

Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions generated from mongabay.com operations (server, data transfer, travel) are mitigated through an association with Anthrotect,
an organization working with Afro-indigenous and Embera communities to protect forests in Colombia's Darien region.
Anthrotect is protecting the habitat of mongabay's mascot: the scale-crested pygmy tyrant.

"Rainforest" is used interchangeably with "rain forest" on this site. "Jungle" is generally not used.